The British Society of Veterinary Pathology
Reversing the Brain Drain: Neuropathology Goes Global

8th - 9th October 2021

The BSVP are delighted to announce this year’s two day autumn meeting:
Reversing the Brain Drain: Neuropathology Goes Global. 

This event is bringing together specialists in Veterinary Neuropathology from around the world, together with speakers from veterinary neurology, human medicine and research, to give you two days full of exciting talks across a variety of topics and species.

We start in Australia with Prof. Brian Summers giving us his approach to neuropathology. We travel around the UK and Europe, and then on to the USA to hear the latest update on canine gliomas and meningiomas from Prof. Jey Koehler, with a stop-over in San Diego for a bonus lecture on the latest applications of brain model technology.

TICKET PRICES

BSVP Member Ticket

£ 100 +VAT
  • Watch the sessions LIVE
  • Can't tune in live? Access on demand
  • Ticket for BSVP membership holders

Non-member Ticket

£ 200 +VAT
  • Watch the sessions LIVE
  • Can't tune in live? Access on demand
  • Ticket for non BSVP membership holders

Non-member Trainee Ticket

£ 75 +VAT
  • Watch the sessions LIVE
  • Can't tune in live? Access on demand
  • Any vet training for board or specialisation exams or student

Trainee Member Ticket

£ 25 +VAT
  • Watch the sessions LIVE
  • Can't tune in live? Access on demand
  • Ticket for BSVP trainee membership holders

EVENT PROGRAMME
Friday 8th October - Day 1

Welcome and housekeeping

This lecture will provide instruction in many aspects of veterinary neuropathology, and will illustrate: 1.the importance of related disciplines such as neuroanatomy, and how contemporary imaging facilitates case investigations 2.the features of common disease processes to which the CNS is subjected such as edema, inflammation, degeneration, demyelination and so on as uniquely manifest in the CNS 3. a reminder of some normal structures which the unwary may mistake for pathologic and some changes encountered in the nervous system in the aging population.

This lecture will provide instruction in many aspects of veterinary neuropathology, and will illustrate: 1.the importance of related disciplines such as neuroanatomy, and how contemporary imaging facilitates case investigations 2.the features of common disease processes to which the CNS is subjected such as edema, inflammation, degeneration, demyelination and so on as uniquely manifest in the CNS 3. a reminder of some normal structures which the unwary may mistake for pathologic and some changes encountered in the nervous system in the aging population.

Diseases of the central nervous system are relatively common in food/large animals. Potential causes include infectious agents, nutritional deficiencies, metabolic disorders, genetic defects, toxins, and idiopathic causes. Based on the author’ diagnostic and teaching experience, this talk will focus on the most important large animals’ diseases affecting the central nervous system. Special attention will be paid to bovine and small ruminants neuropathology. Common malformations, inflammatory lesions due to bacteria (sepsis-meningitis, listeriosis, histophilosis, etc..) viruses (lentiviral and herpesviral encephalitis) and parasites (neosporosis, toxoplasmosis, helminth infestations) will be described together with the main differential diagnosis.

This lecture will review the recently published new classification system for canine gliomas and the work that went into producing it.

The complexity of the human brain, with thousands of neuronal types, permits the development of sophisticated behavioral repertoires, such as language, tool use, self-awareness, symbolic thought, cultural learning and consciousness. Understanding how complex neural netowoks emerge during brain development has been a longstanding challenge for neuroscientists and may bring insights into the evolution of human cognition. Human pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types, such as neurons and glia. Moreover, induced pluripotent stem cells can be achieved from living individuals by reprogramming somatic cells that would capture their entire genome in a pluripotent state. From these pluripotent state, it is possible to generate models of the human brain. The reconstruction of human synchronized network activity in brain organoids in vitro can help to understand how neural network oscillations might contribute to the human brain. Our findings suggest a potential bridge to the gap between the microscale in vitro neural networks electrophysiology and non-invasive electroencephalogram. We also applied this technology to measure the impact of genetic variants in autism spectrum disorders and for evolutionary studies.

Saturday 9th October - Day 2

Welcome and housekeeping

The complex interplay between primary (occurring immediately after head impact) and secondary (evolving over time after impact) pathological events (focal, multifocal and diffuse) comprising traumatic brain injury (TBI) are described and how animal models have contributed to a better understanding of TBI, notwithstanding their significant limitations.

Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in companion animals, specifically dogs and cats. Although only a few small molecule inhibitors/immunotherapies are currently approved for use in veterinary medicine, their use is likely to increase given the marked success of such agents in human cancer treatment. However, this will only be possible if genomic alterations found in canine and feline cancers can be comprehensively identified. Furthermore, broad molecular phenotyping across tumour types could allow for ‘basket trials, as with human cancer patients, in which eligibility for the trial is based on the presence of a specific genomic alteration, irrespective of tumour type. Thus, we propose to sequence ~1,000 cancer-associated genes in canine/feline tumour-germline pairs from 20 cancer types. In a pilot study of canine and feline haemangiosarcoma, we identified novel somatic alterations in driver genes, copy number alterations, mutational signatures and germline alterations; many of these features were also seen in human angiosarcoma. Our next tumour type is canine and feline brain tumours. We hope that comprehensive oncogenomic profiling can help define the landscape driver genes in companion animal cancers thus promoting precision oncology and advances in our understanding of the etiology of these diseases.

Canine idiopathic epilepsy has an estimated prevalence of 0.62% in primary veterinary practice and as such is one of the most common chronic neurological diseases. Descriptions of “epilepsy of unknown origin…..where no symptom characteristic of any other condition has as yet presented” can be found in early veterinary textbooks and although our knowledge is now considerably greater we are still a long way from preventing or curing this enigmatic disease. This lecture concentrates on how to distinguish seizures from other paroxysmal events, the diagnostic work up and the management of epilepsy.

This lecture will review the recently published new classification system for canine gliomas and the work that went into producing it.

This lecture will discuss canine meningioma classification and grading, as well as some recent work of the Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium.

Are you interested in becoming a BSVP member? You can save on the price of your conference ticket!

MEET THE SPEAKERS

Brian Summers

Veterinary graduate of the University of Melbourne; PhD Cornell; sabbatical year at Cambridge (Wellcome Laboratory of Neurology); Professor of Pathology/Neuropathology at Cornell and RVC. 

Professional interests: comparative neuropathology and surgical pathology. Active in residency training in anatomic pathology with >100 residents.

Retired to Melbourne since late 2013 but continue to dabble.

Maria Teresa Capucchio

Professor of General Pathology/Anatomic Pathology at the University of Torino, Italy, Maria Teresa earned her Bachelor in Veterinary Medicine at Torino University, in 1992, and her PhD in Comparative Pathology from the University of Milano, Italy in 2000. Her final dissertation was on neuropathology of domestic animals and particularly on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy. After completing her PhD, Maria Teresa accepted a position of Researcher (1999-2014) at Torino University. During that time, she worked especially on neuropathology of domestic and laboratories animals (tumors, E. cuniculi infection in rabbits, cerebral Theileriosis in cattle, listeriosis) and on pathology due to biological agents focusing in particular her attention on systemic/local infectious diseases like tuberculosis in large animals. In 2014, she accepted an Associate Professor position at the University of Torino, where she has been since that time. At present she is continuing her works on animal neuropathology, but she moved her main research activity on animal production pathology mainly focusing on the evaluation of gut health/systemic morphological alterations following the use of new dietary supplements (natural antioxidants, immunomodulators, milk glycoproteins; antimicrobial peptides, probiotics and insects).

Jey Koehler

Dr. Koehler did her undergraduate work at Auburn University and received her DVM from Louisiana State University in 1996. She was engaged in private practice in small animal medicine and surgery for 11 years before returning to Auburn University for a combined residency in anatomic pathology and PhD in Biomedical Sciences.  She is board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Pathologists in anatomic pathology. Dr. Koehler is currently residency coordinator for anatomic pathology and section chief for the surgical pathology service.  She teaches pathology of the endocrine and nervous system in the veterinary curriculum, and teaches graduate courses in neuropathology, oncologic histopathology, and surgical pathology.

Dr. Koehler is the President of the Davis-Thompson Foundation as well as Director of the organization’s internationally renowned Descriptive Veterinary Pathology course.

She is a founding member of the NIH-led Comparative Brain Tumor Consortium, which is focused on better understanding the biology of canine brain tumors and expanding the use of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring brain tumors in research that aims to benefit cancer patients of both species.  She is also actively involved in collaborative research projects on gene therapy of neurodegenerative diseases, novel neurodevelopmental disorders in cats,  and novel therapies for use in canine brain tumors.

John Finnie

Dr Finnie is a veterinary anatomical pathologist, with a longstanding interest in the pathology and pathogenesis of neurological diseases, both spontaneously-arising neurological disorders of domestic animals and animal models of human central nervous system diseases.

Kieren Allinson

Bio TBC

Jo Moore

Bio TBC

Clare Rusbridge

Clare graduated from University of Glasgow in 1991 and following an internship at University of Pennsylvania and general practice in Cambridgeshire, she completed a residency and was staff Clinician in Neurology at the Royal Veterinary College. She became an ECVN Diplomate in 1996, a RCVS Specialist in 1999 and RCVS Fellow in 2016. She has researched Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia (CMSM) for over 20 years. In 2007 she was awarded a PhD from Utrecht University for her thesis on CMSM and in 2011 she received the J. A. Wright Memorial Award by Blue Cross Animal Welfare Charity. Clare joined Fitzpatrick Referrals and the University of Surrey in 2013; for 16 years prior to this she operated a neurology and neurosurgery service in Wimbledon. She has authored or co-authored over 140 scientific articles (over 50 on CMSM) in addition to several book chapters and co-edited a human medical textbook on syringomyelia. 

Kaspar Matiasek

Bio TBC

Alysson R. Muotri

Dr. Muotri is a professor at the Departments of Pediatrics and Cellular & Molecular Medicine at UC San Diego. He is also the Director of the Stem Cell Program and Archealization Center. Dr. Muotri earned a BSc in Biological Sciences from the State University of Campinas in 1995 and a Ph.D. in Genetics in 2001 from University of Sao Paulo, in Brazil. He moved to the Salk Institute as Pew Latin America Fellow in 2002 for a postdoctoral training in the fields of neuroscience and stem cell biology. His research focuses on brain evolution and modeling neurological diseases using human induced pluripotent stem cells and brain organoids. He has received several awards, including the prestigious NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, NARSAD, Emerald Foundation Young Investigator Award, Surugadai Award, Rock Star of Innovation, NIH EUREKA Award, Telly Awards among several others.

Anna Oevermann

Anna Oevermann is professor of veterinary neuropathology in the Division of Neurological Sciences at the Vetsuisse Faculty of the University of Bern. After graduation in veterinary medicine at the Justus-Liebig University, Giessen and the École Vétérinaire de Nantes she obtained her DVM at the University of Zürich. She worked as practitioner in small animal practice before performing a residency in veterinary pathology at the Institute of Animal Pathology, University of Bern. After obtaining the Dipl. ECVP in 2006 she joined the Division of Neurological Sciences to specialize in neuropathology. Anna Oevermann teaches veterinary neuropathology to under- and postgraduates and is active in diagnostic neuropathology. She studies neurological diseases in animals with a focus on tumors and neuroinfectious diseases. The main research interests of her group are pathomechanisms of neurolisteriosis in farmed ruminants and Listeria monocytogenes-based vaccines for the prevention and therapy of brain tumors and (neuro)infectious diseases. 

Louise Van Der Weyden 

Louise van der Weyden completed a BSc (Hons) at the University of Technology (Sydney, Australia) in 1997, then a PhD in cancer biology at the University of Sydney in 2001, before starting as a post-doctoral fellow at the Wellcome Sanger Institute (United Kingdom). In 2012 she became a Senior Staff Scientist at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and in 2017 was awarded the University of Technology Alumni Award for Excellence (Faculty of Science). She has published more than 100 peer-reviewed papers and is currently on the Editorial Board of Veterinary Sciences and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Pathology.

EVENT SPONSORS

NationWide Laboratories proudly sponsors BSVP Autumn Event 2021. We pride ourselves in our pathologists and support the values of BSVP. This time we share our experiences, thoughts on work-life balance, importance of wellbeing in the profession and sustainability and bring case studies to your attention.

About The British Society of Veterinary Pathology

The objectives of the society are to advance veterinary pathology in all its aspects for the benefit of animals and man; to foster training, to advance education in all aspects of veterinary pathology and to foster communication between pathologists working in various fields. The society was formed in 2006 and is a ‘not for profit’ organisation.

Contact Us

If you have any questions about the BSVP Autumn Meeting please contact:
General email: bsvpsecretariat@gmail.com
Event organiser: Melanie Dobromylskyj – Melanie.Dobromylskyj@finnpathologists.com