Expertise Series
Caring For Your Clients At Their Animals’ End-Of-Life: The total practice approach

This Series will be presented by Caroline Hewson MVB PhD MRCVS (The Pet Loss Vet) and will consist of 3 webinars.

Standard ticket price £147 + Vat

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Platinum Members  just £97 + Vat
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A full-time, small-animal vet typically euthanases 80 to 100 animals each year. Equine vets also perform many euthanasias. In both cases, it is typically Reception who has to take many of the enquiries, book the appointment, take or chase payment, and return the ashes.

Many practices don’t train their Reception team in this. Staff are just expected to know…
Unsurprisingly, many don’t, as found by Onswitch mystery shoppers: many receptionists seem uncaring and just deliver the facts; some don’t seem sure of those. Many front-of-house privately agree they find those calls awkward, and ashes-collection…

What to say? What not to say? How to talk about “the knacker” as an option for equine euthanasia? How to handle silences? Etc.

This 3-part series of webinars will answer all these questions and more. Developed by Dr Caroline Hewson (The Pet Loss Vet), the series is specifically for anyone who works at the front desk—receptionists, veterinary nurses, animal care assistants, and administration staff.

The first webinar introduces the basic background to grief, what affects it, and the different ways it’s expressed. We’ll then cover the basics of empathic communication—a core transferable skill for any emotional client encounter.

Throughout, we’ll be a learning community, with time for questions and a simple action plan so you can try out new wording in your client encounters during the week ahead. We’ll start the next session by sharing our stories of how that worked out, and supporting each other by sharing ideas and wording that worked. It’s all anonymous, but of course you can share your name if you wish.

The second webinar in this 3-part series helping Front-Of-House staff to take their client-care during animals’ end-of-life to the next level.

We’ll start by sharing our stories around how we got on trying out basic empathic wording from last week’s webinar. How did it go?! Maybe it bombed… Maybe it was great! Either way, we hope you’ll share what you feel comfortable telling us, so we can support you—and learn from your successes and struggles. It’s all anonymous, but of course you can share your name if you wish.

We’ll then move on to another core communication skill that is really important when you are giving information to distressed clients—collaboration. Again, there’ll be suggested wording you can try for yourself.

After that we’ll zero-in on the details of handling a phone enquiry about euthanasia—applying the tools of empathic communication and collaboration. There’s no script, just examples of wording and tips for the direction as you talk to the client.

We’ll then start on the euthanasia visit—including the business of what to say when you’re taking payment.

Throughout, we’ll be a learning community, with time for questions and a simple action plan so you can try out new wording in your client encounters during the week ahead.

In the last of the series we’ll then dig in to the rest of the details from the Euthanasia visit: what to say when you’re taking payment. How to handle silence. And anything else that emerges—as with the other webinars, you can ask questions as we go.

After that we’ll talk about the nitty-gritty of ashes collection—the phone call, and the collection itself. Again, wording etc.

Finally, in light of what we’ve covered about grief and the different touch-points, we’ll share ideas around how to manage the touch-points in your practice e.g. how to deal with a PTS enquiry when the front-desk is really busy. Bring an open mind and your best solutions!

Participants who complete the series will come away:
• Knowing they are not alone in aspects of client-care they may find hard, and
• With new knowledge, confidence, and basic skills for handling the diversity of clients and their reactions, at animals’ end-of-life.